Homemade Ginger Ale

You know how on airplanes, everyone around you orders ginger ale to drink? I know that people aren’t drinking that much ginger ale in their day-to-day life on the ground. But ginger ale is such a popular airplane drink because ginger is famous for settling upset tummies, and between the stress of getting to the airport on time, the greasy airport food, and the actual bumps in the air, flying can leave many people feeling a little off.

Ginger ale has always been one of my favorites–usually a treat reserved for traveling and the kid’s table at family holidays. As I mentioned previously, though, my husband recently got me a juicer and I decided to experiment with a homemade version. It’s really simple to make and it tastes like a spicier, more refreshing version of the real thing. Plus it’s full of real ginger–so much of it, that I can literally feel my tummy tingling (in a good way!) when I drink it sometimes. Try the recipe as is the first time, and then you can adjust to your taste. Use more ginger for more spice, more lime for a tarter drink, or more honey if you like it sweeter.

For reference, this is the piece of ginger I used.

P1000911_resized

You’ll end up with a super-concentrated syrup that looks like this.

P1000913_resized

And this is the final product. So refreshing!

P1000915_resized

Homemade Ginger Ale Ingredients

  • 1 big piece of ginger. No need to be exact here; just choose the largest, freshest piece of ginger root you can find in your grocery store. That’s probably the right one for this project.
  • 1 large lime
  • 1 apple
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • sparkling water

Homemade Ginger Ale Method

  • Wash and roughly chop the lime, ginger, and apple so it will fit in the feeder tube of your juicer
  • Juice the lime, ginger, and apple according to manufacturer’s instructions
  • Pour the fresh juice into a small saucepan and add honey. Bring to a roiling boil and let boil for 2-3 minutes. Pour into a jar.
  • Stir syrup into sparkling water. Start with about 4 teaspoons of syrup per cup of sparkling water; add more until it is the right strength for your taste. Save the remaining syrup in the refrigerator and enjoy within a few days.
Advertisements

Sonoran Shrimp Cocktail

My husband and I recently celebrated our first wedding anniversary!

We had agreed not to do gifts, and to spend money instead on a great night out or a little trip, but the husband happened to see a juicer while he was out shopping and, knowing how much I’ve been wanting one, he couldn’t resist getting it for me. To be fair I also broke my end of the deal, but I got him something much less extravagant.

Having a juicer has made my life so much easier. I can make almond milk without having to strain by hand. I have been making syrups with fresh ginger and citrus that I boil on the stove with honey and then mix in with sparkling water for a healthier alternative to soda–kind of like a homemade ginger ale. And most importantly, having a juicer helps me make sure I’m getting enough veggies because, while I can’t large amounts of most eat raw veggies–especially greens–I can juice a huge amount and drink them just fine! I replace a meal or two each week with veggie juice–like a big salad in a cup–and sometimes make green juice to use in my morning smoothies, which helps to cut down on (naturally-occurring) sugars and boost nutrient content.

Chris loves tomato juice and a couple of weeks ago he asked me to make him something like a homemade V8 for a weekend lunch. I’m usually not a fan, but I tasted it and was surprised by how much I liked it. As we were sipping on it, the same thought occurred to both of us: SHRIMP COCKTAIL. 

This is my second variation on the Sonoran shrimp cocktail. As I explain in the first post, this is one of my husband’s favorite, but most recipes call for lots of processed foods including Clamato juice, ketchup, and even orange soda. This version replaces all that with a homemade, fresh-pressed juice made from tons of veggies. Chris claims that he likes it even more than the traditional stuff, and whether you have special dietary restrictions or not, this version is definitely much healthier!

Sonoran shrimp cocktail is usually more of a summer food since it is served at room temperature or chilled, but maybe you need a break from all the heavy holiday food. Rumor has it shrimp cocktails are also a miracle cure for hangovers–not that anyone would need to worry about that during the holiday season, of course. I think this could even be served up in small glasses as an alternative to the classic shrimp cocktail appetizer. Also, I’ve listed approximate amounts of everything below, but you know, feel free to mix it up if you like your juice more or less spicy, for example.

I mean, this is just what goes into the juice. This dish should be able to revive the dead, not just the hungover.P1000896__1416170084_61672__1416170084_63047

These are the veggies that should get chopped up to be eaten instead of drunk.P1000904__1416170000_56295__1416170000_14550

Chopped veggies waiting for a delicious juice bath.P1000905__1416170243_66839__1416170243_87530

Looking at this picture makes me want to be on the beach. With one of these to munch on.P1000909__1416170275_58108__1416170275_27179

Sonoran Shrimp Cocktail Ingredients

Juice Ingredients

  • 6-8 medium sized tomatoes
  • 3 carrots, chopped into 2-inch pieces
  • 2 sweet bell peppers (red, yellow, or orange), stemmed and seeded
  • 2 peeled oranges
  • 4-5 stalks celery, chopped into 2-inch pieces
  • 2-3 handfuls baby spinach (I know, my measurements are super precise here)
  • 15-20 small chives (about the equivalent to 1/4 cup roughly chopped)
  • the stems from a bunch of cilantro
  • 1-2 jalapenos, stemmed and seeded
  • 1 beet, chopped in half
  • the juice of two limes
  • 1/3 cup coconut aminos*
  • 2 tablespoons hot sauce of choice (we like Cholula!)
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

*I always thought coconut aminos were SCD legal. I’ve recently found out this is controversial in the SCD community, but most people report no ill effects of including them in their diet. If you feel uncomfortable adding coconut aminos, simply omit and add sea salt to taste as a replacement.

Other Ingredients

  • 1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cucumbers, peeled, seeded, and finely diced
  • 1/2 red onion, finely diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 jalapeno, stemmed, seeded, and finely diced
  • the tops of a bunch of cilantro, finely diced
  • 2 avocados, peeled and diced

Sonoran Shrimp Cocktail Method

  • First prepare your juice. Wash all of your veggies really well. Juice all of the vegetables and fruits, except for the lime, listed in the juice ingredients according to your juicer’s instructions.
    • Pour the juice into a saucepan and place over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and let boil about 5 minutes, until it has reduced slightly. Remove from heat. NOTE: If you are going to eat all of your cocktail immediately, you can probably skip this step. However, for food safety reasons, any fresh pressed juices should be pasteurized or boiled if you do not expect to consume them in less than 24 hours.
    • Stir in the coconut aminos, hot sauce, fish sauce, and sea salt. Taste and adjust seasoning. Then place in the refrigerator to chill for at least one hour.
  • Meanwhile, prepare the shrimp. Toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Then grill over medium heat until pink and curled.
    • When the shrimp are cool enough to handle, remove tails and cut into bite-sized pieces. Set in refrigerator to chill.
  • Finally, prepare the rest of your ingredients. Combine the cucumbers, onion, garlic, jalapeno, and cilantro in a large bowl. NOTE: I use the food processor to chop these ingredients quickly, finely, and uniformly. Chill until ready to serve.
  • Add in the juice to the large bowl and stir to combine. Serve in bowls topped with shrimp and avocado, with extra lime and hot sauce on the side.